Posts Tagged ‘anda union’

Top of the World albums: issue #124 (January/February 2017)

Posted on December 7th, 2016 in Features, Recent posts by .

Here is our selection of the top ten new releases reviewed in Songlines issue #124 (January/February 2017). Tracks from each of these albums are included on the free cover-CD with issue #124. To find out more about subscribing to Songlines, please visit: songlines.co.uk/subs

 

anda-union-title-cover

Anda Union
Homeland
Hohhot Records
Distinguished songs about nature, history and identity from this nine-piece Inner Mongolian group, featuring horse-head fiddles, beating drums and growly throat singing.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

gaye-su-akyol-title-cover

Gaye Su Akyol
Hologram Imparatorluğu
Glitterbeat
Steeped in Turkish culture, but with plenty of outside influences, songs focus on liberation of the self. Akyol creates an eclectic collection of global influences, music without borders.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

tanya-tagaq-title-cover

Tanya Tagaq
Retribution
Six Shooter Records
Based on a theme of exploitation and embracing a range of musical forms including rap, rock and Tuvan throat singing, this is Tagaq’s most ambitious and exhilarating work to date.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

calais-sessions-title-cover

Various Artists
The Calais Sessions
Sessions of the World
This is an extraordinarily moving collaboration recorded in the now extinct Calais ‘Jungle’. A resilient testament to the human spirit will reduce you to tears, but also uplift your heart.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

luisa-maita-fio-da-memoria-cover

Luísa Maita
Fio da Memória
Cumbancha
Both deceptively commercial and coolly cutting-edge, this masterpiece is full of post-modern lullabies and dubby samba deconstructions swathed in cavernous, minimalist production.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

sarah-jane-summers-juhani-silvola-title-cover

Sarah-Jane Summers & Juhani Silvola
Widdershins
Dell Daisy Records
A fantastic showcase of Scottish and Finnish traditions by one of the finest folk duos around. A magical musical relationship.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

orchestre-poly-rythmo-madjafalao-cover

Le Tout-Puissant Orchestre Poly-Rythmo
Madjafalao
Because Music
Slinky horn grooves, soukous guitars and simmering Afrobeat prove the group’s flame is still alight led by original member Vincent Ahehehinnou.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

aslan2016

Çiğdem Aslan
A Thousand Cranes
Asphalt Tango Records
A beautifully haunting exploration of rebetika, and a magnificent gesture towards proving that Greek-Turkish culture is more similar than different. Aslan is at the top of her game.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

daoiri-farrell-title-cover

Daoirí Farrell
True Born Irishman
Daoirí Recordings
Referred to as a Paul Brady for his generation, Farrell’s honest passion for the songs he’s collected, shines in what could be the most significant Irish release of recent years.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

bollywood-brass-band-title-cover

Bollywood Brass Band feat Jyotsna Srikanth
Carnatic Connection
Bollywood Brass Band
An energetic and cinematic journey to South India, with fuel provided by Jyotsna Srikanth’s Karnatic violin.
Amazon | iTunes | Spotify

 

Pick up the latest issue of Songlines to enjoy our Top of the World cover-CD, which contains tracks from each of the albums above. To find out more about subscribing to Songlines, visit: songlines.co.uk/subs

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , .

Songlines Best Albums of 2016

Posted on November 24th, 2016 in News, Recent posts, Reviews by .

Best Albums 2016

Songlines’ editors Jo Frost and Simon Broughton select their favourite albums of 2016

Jo Frost and Simon Broughton have handpicked their ten favourite albums of the year from over 700 featured reviews. These are the albums they found themselves returning to over and over, and the discs that made a lasting impression. Here are their choices for year’s greatest albums, but be sure to pick up a copy of the new issue (January/February 2017, #124), on sale December 9, for a full rundown.  

Subscribe to Songlines today and discover the best music from around the world. Find out more.


Anda Union  – Homeland
(Hohhot Records, will be reviewed in #124)
These are distinguished songs about nature, history and identity from this nine-strong Inner Mongolian group, featuring horse head fiddles and growly throat singing.


Bollywood Brass Band & Jyotsna Srikanth – Carnatic Connection
(Bollywood Brass Band, will be reviewed in #124)
An energetic and cinematic journey south, with fuel provided by Jyotsna Srikanth’s Karnatic violin. Renditions of AR Rahman compositions appear alongside South Indian musical gems.


Calypso Rose – Far from Home
(Because Music, reviewed in #120)

With the help of Manu Chao, the Calypso queen represents her home country of Trinidad and Tobago, covering a range of social and political issues with a contemporary Caribbean flair.


Roberto Fonseca – ABUC
(Impulse!, reviewed in #123)
A raucous, dizzying journey back and forth through Fonseca’s Afro-Cuban musical heritage. An ambitious and convincing offering from the young maestro.


Derek Gripper – Libraries on Fire
(Derek Gripper, reviewed in #119)
With great aplomb, the South African takes on the compositions of the great 21-stringed kora players on his classical guitar. Gripper’s delicate transcriptions deliver beautiful results.


Kefaya – Radio International
(Radio International Records, reviewed in #122)
This debut album fizzes with the energy of the international collective’s acclaimed live shows and is hard hitting with its political commentary.


Lakou Mizik – Wa Di Yo
(Cumbancha, reviewed in #117)
Lakou Mizik’s debut is a passionate tribute to the people and culture of Haiti. Formed in the aftermath of the country’s 2010 earthquake, the collective deliver a project of celebration and hope.


Leyla McCalla – A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey
(Jazz Village, reviewed in #119)
An outstanding sophomore album from the young cellist and banjo player. Three years on from her stellar debut, McCalla once again draws from her Haitian heritage and Creole influences.


Vaudou Game – Kidayú
(Hot Casa Records, reviewed in #122)
Vaudou Game take a magpie-like approach to African music styles, uniquely blending Afrobeat, Ethio-jazz and highlife for an album that is unpredictable and fresh from start to finish.


Various Artists, featuring Musicians of the Calais ‘Jungle’ – The Calais Sessions
(Sessions of the World, will be reviewed in #124)
An extraordinarily and moving collaborative album. The resilient testament to the human spirit will reduce you to tears, but also uplift your heart.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Now listen to this… Aziza Brahim, Anda Union and Joan Soriano

Posted on February 26th, 2016 in Features, Recent posts by .

Songlines Playlist

Here at Songlines Towers we’re always on the lookout for the most exciting music from around the world.
Check out our playlist of tracks that we’ve been listening to.

Aziza Brahim – ‘Lagi’
Aziza Brahim performs a stunning live take of the track from her album Soutak. Brahim is to appear on the cover of next issue (April 2016, #116).

 

Anda Union – ‘Hometown’
It’s been five years since the Mongolian band were a hit at WOMAD, but now they’re back and recently finished a tour of the UK, performing material from their forthcoming album, Jangar. This is a beautifully haunting song, full of horse-head fiddles (morin huur) and throat-singing (khöömei) that transports you to the grasslands of their Inner Mongolian home.

 

Joan Soriano – ‘Simplemente Amigos’
Bachata singer and guitarist Joan Soriano released his new album Me Decidí last year, his first solo effort in five years. ‘Simplemente Amigos’ is a delightful number from the album, and a reminder of why the musician’s music has been missed.

 

Yvonne Chaka Chaka – ‘Sangoma’
Yvonne Chaka Chaka has been one of the leading figureheads of the South African dance-pop scene for more than three decades. This groovy joint is a sped up version of the 1987 hit, discovered via Awesome Tapes from Africa.

 

Molotov Jukebox – ‘Neon Lights’
The exciting tropical fusion group Molotov Jukebox will release their second album, Tropical Gypsy, in April. ‘Neon Lights’, taken from their debut Carnival Flower, is an ode to the city of London.

Tags: , , , .

The 50 Greatest World Music Albums of the Last Five Years (Part 4)

Posted on August 23rd, 2015 in Features, Recent posts by .

Editor Jo Frost and editor-in-chief Simon Broughton choose their favourite albums from 2011…

Anda-Union--The-Wind-Horse

Anda Union

The Wind Horse

(Hohhot Records)

Undoubtedly one of the most talked about bands at WOMAD 2011, this group of throat-singing, horse head fiddle players are from Inner Mongolia, China. Musically, there are similarities with the Tuvan group Huun Huur Tu, but with the addition of two excellent female singers. Their highly evocative music conjures up impressions of vast expanses of sparsely populated grasslands, as depicted in a documentary about the band recently shown at the London Film Festival. This album is definitely one for equine fans – the whinnying sounds they make on ‘Galloping Horses’ is quite amazing. JF

 

Aurelio--Laru-Beya

Aurelio

Laru Beya

(Real World)

It’s thanks to the late Belizean singer Andy Palacio that the culture and music of the Central American Garifuna people is known internationally. Aurelio Martinez dedicates this album to his friend and mentor, with a particularly beautiful song written in Palacio’s honour, ‘Wamada’. In addition to the drum and percussion heavy Garifuna rhythms, there are contributions from Youssou N’Dour and Orchestra Baobab – a result of Aurelio’s Rolex Mentor-Protégé initiative with Youssou back in 2007 [see #64]. These West African vocal additions were recorded on one of Aurelio’s trips to Dakar, tracing the roots of his ancestors – he describes this album as ‘a homecoming.’ Palacio’s Garifuna legacy is in safe hands with Aurelio. JF

 

 

Balkan-Brass-Battle

Boban & Marko Marković Orkestar and Fanfare Ciocărlia

Balkan Brass Battle

(Asphalt Tango)

The story is a great one – the two top Gypsy bands in the Balkans go head to head. Boban and Marko Marković, the kings of Balkan brass from the ‘Trubacka Republika’ (Trumpet Republic) of Serbia versus Fanfare Ciocărlia, the peasant upstarts, from Romania. Each band does a few of their own tunes, they each do a version of Duke Ellington’s ‘Caravan’ and they do four tracks together. A gristly gobbet of the best of Balkan brass. SB

 

Blind-Note

Blind Note

Blind Note

(Muziekpublique)

It’s the haunting sound of the Armenian duduk on the opening track ‘Chiraki Par’ that initially got me hooked. Then there’s the fact that the musicians, from Armenia, Turkey, Mexico, Senegal and Madagascar, all now based in Belgium, recorded the album in aid of a Belgian NGO, Light for the World, who raise money for blind children in Africa. But regardless of the good cause, it’s the simplicity and sensitivity of the music they’ve created that makes this album so noteworthy. Interestingly, Muziekpublique only release one or two albums a year – their main work is putting on concerts and music classes in a small venue in Brussels. JF

 

Carminho--Fado

Carminho

Fado

(EMI Portugal)

Every young fado singer has got to market themselves as the new voice of fado. But Carminho is the one to watch. She has a versatile intimacy in her voice, as if she’s talking to you personally, and some of the lyrics she’s written herself, which give songs like ‘Nunca é Silêncio Vão’ a special intensity. Featuring several fine Portuguese guitar players, this CD represents a spectacular debut with the opening ‘Escrevi teu Nome no Vento’ a particular highlight with a gorgeous melody and delivery. SB

 

 

Cecil-Sharp-Project

Cecil Sharp Project

Cecil Sharp Project

(EFDSS/Shrewsbury Folk Festival)

So often, well-intended collaborative ‘projects’ look great on paper but don’t work in practice, seeming forced and lacking in real musical connection. Not so with this project, which I was privileged to witness in action when the eight musicians spent a week together coming up with the songs for a series of concerts and album [see #78]. The idea is simple enough – putting into song the experiences of English folk collector Cecil Sharp during his trip to Appalachia. It’s the quality of the musicianship and their obvious enjoyment in working and playing together that is striking, particularly on tracks such as ‘The Great Divide’ and ‘The Ghost of Songs’. JF

 

Dawda-Jobarteh--Northern-Light-Gambian-Night

Dawda Jobarteh

Northern Light Gambian Night

(Sterns)

For me the kora is the greatest of African instruments, providing a sublime accompaniment or as a marvellous solo instrument in its own right. Dawda Jobarteh comes from one of the great griot dynasties in the Gambia and, now living in Denmark, he’s produced this album in which he does both with guitarist Preben Carlsen and lots of guest musicians. One of the loveliest tracks, ‘Nkanakele’, features South Indian flute player Shashank and apparently the wild guitar on ‘Dinding Do’ is actually Dawda Jobarteh on electric kora. A great debut album from an impressive new artist and it closes with a stately duet with the supreme kora maestro Toumani Diabaté. SB

 

Anoushka-Shankar--Traveller

Anoushka Shankar

Traveller

(Deutsche Grammophon)

The meeting of Indian music and flamenco isn’t new, but this is one of the best products of that fusion. Sitar player Anoushka Shankar (daughter of Ravi) worked with guitarist and (Grammy-award winning) producer Javier Limón on an album that really does chart a musical and emotional journey, if not a geographical one. There are great vocals from Buika, Duquende and Sandra Carrasco on the flamenco side and Shubha Mudgal and Sanjeev Chimmalgi on the Indian side and spectacular sitar duets from Anoushka and flamenco pianist Pedro Ricardo Miño and flamenco guitarist Pepe Habichuela. An exuberant recording which is one of the highlights of the year. SB

 

 

Tamburising

Söndörgő

Tamburising

(World Village)

Söndörgő – hard to say, but easy to listen to – are a fabulous young band from Hungary. They have now started to make an international impact and this CD and their spectacular live shows are the reason. On delicate plucked tamburas, they play the music of the South Slav minorities in Hungary – virtuoso dance tunes that are fiery, but delicate. This CD, featuring Gypsy tambura master József Kovács, from whom they’ve learned many of their tunes, is a great calling card with a cross section of their repertoire as played in the southern city of Mohács. In addition to the tambura repertoire they play some great Macedonian tunes – notably the popular ‘Zajdi, Zajdi’ with their secret weapon, fabulous vocalist Kátya Tompos. SB

 

Abigail-Washburn--City-of-Refuge

Abigail Washburn

City of Refuge

(Rounder)

To describe Abigail Washburn as a singer-songwriter and banjo player seems woefully inadequate when you realise this is a woman who has become an unofficial US goodwill ambassador to China (she speaks and sings in Chinese). The illustrative album artwork, depicting a multitude of exotic-looking places and faces, is a good indication of what you’re going to hear. It’s an enchanting treasure trove of musical treats, featuring a host of instruments, from double bass, viola, guzheng (zither) and the beautiful yet rarely heard cello banjo (on ‘Bring Me My Queen’). JF

← Prev    1    2    3    4    5    Next →

Tags: , , , , , , , .

« Older Entries               

Switch to our mobile site