Posts Tagged ‘folk’

The first Manchester Folk Festival

Posted on September 27th, 2017 in Recent posts by .

Afro-Celt-Blog

Afro Celt Sound System photo by Louis DeCarlo

The first ever edition of the Manchester Folk Festival will take place on October 19-22

Manchester Folk Festival has announced its full line-up of concerts, film screenings, theatrical experiences, workshops and ‘pub singarounds’ ahead of the very first edition this October. The festival will focus on supporting and presenting new folk and acoustic music, and will host the English Folk Expo showcase. Concerts and events will take place city-wide, with a festival hub at HOME.

The line-up is set to include

John Smith (with Georgia Lewis and Nina Harries)
Vishtèn (with DJ Mark Radcliffe’s Galleon Blast)
Jon Boden & the Remnant Kings (with Alistair Anderson & Northlands and Ninebarrow)
Afro Celt Sound System (pictured above, with The Nightjar and Sound of the Sirens)
Keston Cobblers Club (with Jinnwoo and Jack Rutter)
The Young’uns (with Jackie Oates and The East Pointers)
Josienne Clarke and Ben Walker
Tom Robinson (with Edgelarks and Irish Mythen)
Stick in the Wheel
False Lights (with Kings of the South Seas)

 

Get tickets and find out more here.

Tags: , , , , .

Watch: Kings of the South Seas – ‘Lady Franklin’

Posted on September 27th, 2017 in Recent posts by .

London-based folk trio Kings of the South Seas release a new video from their forthcoming album, Franklin

Following the disappearance of Captain John Franklin’s arctic expedition in the 19th century, his wife Lady Jane Franklin sponsored several missions to discover his fate. The search continued for decades; Inuit stories of cannibalism were dismissed, though have since been suggested as largely accurate.

The loss of the expedition and the subsequent failed searches affected many, and left a wealth of musical, theatrical and literary material in its wake. The second release from Kings of the South Seas, Franklin, brings to life the music collected from these events, and features Canadian Voyageur paddling songs, English folk ballads, songs composed onboard ice-bound wintering ships and Victorian parlour pieces.  The lead single, ‘Lady Franklin’, is a broadside from the 1850s.

Franklin was recorded in St Andrew’s Mission Church in Gravesend, beneath the stained glass windows dedicated by Lady Franklin to the lost lives of the arctic voyage.

Accompanying the group on their live tour will be Polar Archaeologist Peter Wilson. Catch them live on these dates:

Oct 4 - Cecil Sharp House, London
Oct 5 -  Loders Village Hall, Bridport
Oct 6- St Andrews, Gravesham Arts, Kent
Oct 21 - Folk Expo – Manchester (without Peter Wilson)

Franklin is due to be released on Hudson Records, February 2 2018.

Tags: , , , .

Turner Sims announce World Music series

Posted on September 12th, 2017 in Live, News, Recent posts by .

Kayhan Kalhor & Toumani Diabaté, Morgenland Festival 2016-©Andy Spyr::Morgenland Festival Osnabrück-Free1

Fifty years ago the University of Southampton was bequeathed with a generous donation intended to support musical practice in the city.

The beautifully ornate Turner Sims hall – named after its benefactor Miss Margaret Grassam Sims – opened in 1974 and is now established as a premiere performance venue in the South of England.

This year’s Autumn season is of particular interest with a special world music series that features Irish quartet Lankum, Malian guitarist Habib Koité and his compatriot Toumani Diabaté who will perform as part of a duo with kamancheh maestro Kayhan Kalhor.

A similarly enticing prospect is a joint performance from Omar Sosa and Seckou Keita in support of their new record Transparent Water. They will be joined by Afro-Venezuealan percussionist Gustavo Oyalles – who contributed featured on the album – for an exploration of polyrhythms and improvisatory craft, teasing out the overlap between West African and Latin American musical practice.

Here is the complete list of dates for the series:

Lankum – October 14

Habib Koité – October 20

Omar Sosa and Seckou Keita present Transparent Water – November 9

Toumani Diabaté and Kayhan Kalhor – November 21

Värttinä – December 8

More information (including ticketing) is available on the Turner Sims website.

Tags: , , , , , , , .

Sam Lee interview: “It’s wonderful taking folk music slap bang into Piccadilly”

Posted on May 25th, 2017 in Features, Recent posts by .

Sam-Lee_Songlines-52

(photo by Alex Harvey-Brown)

This interview is an extract from the June 2017 (#128) issue of Songlines. To read the full interview order a copy of the edition at: www.songlines.co.uk/subs

As Sam Lee brings his Norwegian-British sound-jam Vindauga to this year’s Songlines Encounters Festival and pushes folk onto the big screen in Guy Ritchie’s new film, Nathaniel Handy steps into the headspace of folk music’s polymath.

Sam Lee is a song collector. More than that, he favours full-immersion baptism in the Gypsy and Traveller folk singing communities from which he has gleaned an oral repository. Yet he is not only a conserver of song, but also a conservationist more broadly. “Before folk music, I worked in nature studies doing a lot of wilderness training. It’s my first passion,” he tells me. And should the son and heir of Madonna and Guy Ritchie one day become a famous survival expert, we may well have Sam Lee to thank for it.

He brought his bushcraft to the Ritchie household in Wiltshire when he was invited to discuss a new film project with the director. “Guy likes folk music,” reveals Lee. “He was making a film set in the first century and he wanted folk music. He wanted that sense of authenticity.” The film in question is the blockbuster King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, a sprawling epic of English braveheartedness set for release on May 19.

 

“I’m using the same principles as conservationists of rewilding certain areas of land into being musical places”

 

“I went down to his house in Wiltshire and he took me on a tour round the grounds,” Lee remembers. “I taught him and his son a few things about the outdoors and he was like, ‘Geezer, how come there’s this Jewish kid who knows all about folk music and the outdoors?’ He just couldn’t get his head around it. But he said, ‘Right, we’ll get you in the film’.”

Lee visited the Warner Bros Studios in Leavesden where he saw the sheer scale of a film that was also shot on location in Snowdonia, the Forest of Dean, Windsor Great Park and the Isle of Skye’s distinctive Quiraing region. “It’s enormous,” says Lee. “Castles. Cave systems. What they’ve built is phenomenal.”

It’s not the usual setting for English folk music, which is what makes Ritchie’s punt so brave. “He just put me in a studio with some scenes and said, ‘Sing’,” Lee explains. “I actually went for Scottish Traveller ballads, because they’re my favourites, but also because they have that sense of drama. A little bit of the song ‘The Wild, Wild Berry’ came to me.” It was to become the soundtrack to a trailer that has gone viral. “They said they’d never had a reaction to a song on a trailer like it,” says Lee. “I was immediately bombarded by people asking, ‘Dude, what sort of music is this? Where can I find it?’ It’s unbelievable what’s happened to it.”

These are certainly strange environs for folk music. The trailer reveals classic Hollywood treatment, with a fantastical monster and CGI galore. It is English myth remade for the action movie age. Such big screen treatment of British folk song might make some uneasy, but Lee believes it’s high time it got the exposure. “The art of cinema is about trying to create an experience,” he says. “Folk music is a brilliant way to transport a viewer, which is why you get bagpipes all the time; they’re a great way of getting a sense of drama, ancientness and ensuing battle. It’s amazing that British folk hasn’t been utilised more in the way that American folk music has been in so much American cinema.”

 

 

PODCAST Listen to Sam Lee talk about Vindauga on the Kings Place podcast:

Tags: , , .

« Older Entries